Engage

You can help progress our research

You don't have to be a scientist to get involved with QBI. We offer a range of opportunities for everyday people to connect and progress our research and discoveries.

The foundation for all of our work is the funding we receive through a range of sources, including philanthropic donations from our generous supporters. There are many ways to give to QBI: directly, through planned giving, or holding fundraising events that entertain or challenge supporters as they dig deep to help us better understand the brain. 

We also offer opportunities for students to learn directly from our inspiring researchers through lab placements, and for community members to tour our facilities and attend events. Finally, you can give one of the greatest gifts of all by volunteering for studies to advance treatments and diagnostics for brain diseases and disorders.

What your donations fund

Through your support you are helping QBI solve the major neurological health challenges facing our community today

World leading research

Brightest scientific minds

Solutions to global health challenges

Discovery Research Endowment Fund
 

Find out more        Donate to research

QBI’s Discovery Research Endowment Fund supports scientists exploring the unknown, which will guide new research on finding cures for diseases or improving quality of life.

Community & school programs

 

Australian Brain Bee

The Australian Brain Bee Challenge (ABBC) is a competition for high school students in year 10 to learn about the brain and its functions, learn about neuroscience research, find out about careers in neuroscience and to dispel misconceptions about neurological and mental illnesses. 
 

Learn more


Volunteer for a research study

QBI offers the public the opportunity to become involved in our research
through volunteering in a range of our human studies.

Your help may be vital to solving some of humanity's greatest ailments
and answering some of the biggest questions we face.
 

Find out more

Research in action

  • Casual Coral Watch Assistant
    Queensland Brain Institute
  • Nestor

    Group Leader

    Professor Peter Nestor

    Professor in Neuroscience
    Queensland Brain Institute
    Researcher profile is public: 
    1
    Supervisor: 
    Researcher biography: 

    Prof Nestor joined the Queensland Brain Institute in October/2017 and has a conjoint appointment as a cognitive neurologist at Mater Misericordiae Ltd (Mater Hospital).

    His particular interests include understanding the earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease (i.e. before dementia is established); atypical forms of dementia with a particular focus on primary progressive aphasia; and improving differential diagnosis between the major categories of neurodegenerative diseases.

    He works on development of neuropsychological tests of cognition, both to acccurately track change over time and improve diagnostic accuracy between the major diseases causing dementia. He also uses multi-modal imaging (magnetic resonance imaging [MRI] and positron emission tomography [PET]) to understand the sequence of events occuring in degenerative brain diseases (particularly Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, Parkinson's disease, motor neuron disease [ALS], progressive supranuclear palsy [PSP] and corticobasal degeneration [CBD]) and identify novel biomarkers. A major focus of his is on developing novel approaches to MR imaging for single subject pathological diagnoses that can be exported into the everyday clinical setting; recent examples include diffusion tensor imaging to identify PSP and CBD (Sajjadi et al, 2013) and quantitative susceptibility mapping in Parkinson's disease (Acosta-Cabornero et al, 2013).

    Body: 

    Professor Peter Nestor: Cognitive neurology

    Professor Nestor aims to relate the neuropsychological and behavioural profiles of degenerative dementias, such as Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia, to regional brain damage through neuroimaging (MRI and PET) and histopathological analysis. His particular interest is the pathological landscape of incipient dementia (so-called mild cognitive impairment).

    Find out more


     

    Research Members

    Dr Soo Lee

    Clinical Research Coordinator
    Queensland Brain Institute
    Researcher profile is public: 
    0
    Supervisor: 

    Students

    Emily McCann

    PhD Student
    Queensland Brain Institute
    Researcher profile is public: 
    1
    Supervisor: 

    Benjamin Wang

    Honours Student
    Queensland Brain Institute
    Researcher profile is public: 
    1
    Supervisor: 

    Dr Joshua Flavell

    PhD Student
    Queensland Brain Institute
    Researcher profile is public: 
    1
    Supervisor: 
    Researcher biography: 

    Joshua is a psychiatry registrar working between Queensland Health and Mater Health in Brisbane, Queensland. He is undertaking advanced training in psychogeriatrics and a fellowship in cognitive disorders. His medical interest is in the field of neurodegenerative diseases, specifically dementia. Joshua is undertaking a PhD at the Queensland Brain Institute under the supervision of Professor Nestor. His thesis is focused on improving the diagnosis of the behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) and differentiating the disease from phenocopy conditions.

    Extracurricularly, Joshua has a strong passion for fitness and health. He spends his spare time swimming and training for events, such as triathlons, ocean swims, and charity runs.

    Support Staff

    Mrs Felicia Coleman

    Research Assistant
    Queensland Brain Institute
    Researcher profile is public: 
    0
    Supervisor: 

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