Speaker:

Dr Dhanisha Jhaveri

Mater Research Institute and Queensland Brain Institute, University of Queensland

Title: "Regulation and function of distinct neurogenic precursors in the adult brain"

Abstract: Neurogenesis has emerged as an important cellular mechanism underpinning plasticity in the adult mammalian brain. Understanding the role of new neurons in regulating learning, memory and mood has been the subject of intense experimentation and debate. In this talk, I will present our progress in addressing whether new neurons are a necessary component of both the etiology and treatment of depression/anxiety. Building on our previous discoveries that have uncovered distinct populations of quiescent stem/precursor cells in the adult hippocampus, I will present data unravelling their molecular signature and identifying pharmacological agents that can selectively activate these subpopulations and enhance neuronal production with the goal of utilising these to examine functional improvement in a mouse model of depression. I will also present our recent findings that have established the basolateral amygdala as a neurogenic region in the adult brain, harbouring precursors which generate new, functional interneurons. Given that the hippocampus and the amygdala are key brain regions implicated in depression and anxiety, our findings provide the framework for not only understanding the function of new neurons derived from these distinct neurogenic precursors but also for manipulating their activity to regulate circuitry and behaviour.

About Neuroscience Seminars

Neuroscience seminars at the QBI play a major role in the advancement of neuroscience in the Asia-Pacific region. The primary goal of these seminars is to promote excellence in neuroscience through the exchange of ideas, establishing new collaborations and augmenting partnerships already in place.

While seminars in the QBI Auditorium have been suspended due to COVID-19, we will still be holding seminars via Zoom. The days and times of these seminars will vary depending on the time zone of the speaker. Please see each seminar listed below for details. 

 

Neuroscience Seminars archive 2005-2018