Speaker:

Professor John McGrath

Queensland Brain Institute, University of Queensland, Australia, and Niels Bohr Professor, Aarhus University, Denmark 

Title:  Convergent evidence implicates vitamin D deficiency and voltage-gated calcium channel function in schizophrenia

Abstract:

Variants in voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) have been linked to risk of schizophrenia, as has prenatal vitamin D deficiency, known to be important in calcium homeostasis. In this talk I will provide a summary of recent research done in collaboration with colleagues at QBI and in Denmark that has investigated a mechanism that links these independent observations. We measured 25 hydroxyvitamin D in neonatal dried blood spots (n = 2602), and found that those in the lowest quintile of 25OHD concentration had a relative risk of schizophrenia of 1.44 (95%CI: 1.12-1.85) compared to the reference quintile. Using molecular, functional imaging and electrophysiological approaches, we demonstrate that the active form of vitamin D (1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D) induces rapid, non-genomic effects on calcium regulation in developing cortical neurons and brain. These include increased surface expression of L-type VGCCs in primary cortical neurons, and rapid-onset enhanced calcium influx in a subset of prefrontal cortex cortical neurons. Our findings provide convergent evidence that these epidemiological and genetic risk factors may operate via shared biological pathways.

 

 

About Neuroscience Seminars

Neuroscience seminars at the QBI play a major role in the advancement of neuroscience in the Asia-Pacific region. The primary goal of these seminars is to promote excellence in neuroscience through the exchange of ideas, establishing new collaborations and augmenting partnerships already in place.

The scheduled QBI Neuroscience Seminar series are held on Wednesdays from 11am-12pm in the Level 7 Auditorium of the Queensland Brain Institute, Building 79, St Lucia Campus, The University of Queensland. Additional seminars may be held at other times as listed below.

 

Neuroscience Seminars archive 2005-2016