Speaker:

Dr Eric Kim

Northeastern University, Boston, USA

Title: "Cortical pathology of Huntington's disease in the human brain & Nanoparticle-based sensors for neurobiology"

Abstract:

Part I: The cellular basis of variable symptoms in Huntington's disease (HD) is unclear. One important possibility is that degeneration of pyramidal neurons and interneurons, which together play a major role in modulating cortical output to the basal ganglia, may play a significant role in the development of variable symptomatology in HD. My study aimed to examine whether symptom variability in HD is specifically associated with variable degeneration of cortical neurons.

Part II: Advances in optical probes and imaging methods have enabled entirely new possibilities for studying neural cells and circuits at the chemical level. As part of my postdoctoral studies, I was involved in fabricating and utilising optical nanoscale sensors (fluorescence and MRI) for imaging chemical signaling in the brain, specifically calcium ions, sodium ions, and neurotransmitter acetylcholine.

 

 

Northeastern University, Boston, USA 

Title: "Cortical pathology of Huntington's disease in the human brain & Nanoparticle-based sensors for neurobiology"

Abstract:

Part I: The cellular basis of variable symptoms in Huntington's disease (HD) is unclear. One important possibility is that degeneration of pyramidal neurons and interneurons, which together play a major role in modulating cortical output to the basal ganglia, may play a significant role in the development of variable symptomatology in HD. My study aimed to examine whether symptom variability in HD is specifically associated with variable degeneration of cortical neurons.
Part II: Advances in optical probes and imaging methods have enabled entirely new possibilities for studying neural cells and circuits at the chemical level. As part of my postdoctoral studies, I was involved in fabricating and utilising optical nanoscale sensors (fluorescence and MRI) for imaging chemical signaling in the brain, specifically calcium ions, sodium ions, and neurotransmitter acetylcholine.
 

 

About Neuroscience Seminars

Neuroscience seminars at the QBI play a major role in the advancement of neuroscience in the Asia-Pacific region. The primary goal of these seminars is to promote excellence in neuroscience through the exchange of ideas, establishing new collaborations and augmenting partnerships already in place.

While seminars in the QBI Auditorium have been suspended due to COVID-19, we will still be holding seminars via Zoom. The days and times of these seminars will vary depending on the time zone of the speaker. Please see each seminar listed below for details. 

 

Neuroscience Seminars archive 2005-2018