Applicants may be able to apply for UQ merit-based scholarships. There are two scholarship rounds per year for both domestic and international candidates. Financial assistance may include:

To be considered in the next available scholarship round, you must be nominated by QBI, and assessed as ‘eligible for admission and scholarship’ by the UQ Graduate School by the relevant date.

Full information about these schemes can be found at the UQ Graduate School website and at the full UQ Research Scholarships policy.  

Please note that scholarships are extremely competitive, especially for international students. In general, successful international applicants have highly relevant and recent degrees, outstanding grades, and at least one or two publications in internationally recognised journals.

Students might also wish to apply for scholarships such as the Endeavour Postgraduate Award, or other external scholarships from their home countries and/or industry. QBI may be able to request a tuition fee offset scholarship for international applicants who secure external funding to the value of the Australian Government Research Training Program.

Information on other postgraduate scholarships, both international and domestic, may be obtained from the UQ Scholarships website, and from The Good Universities Guide, ‘Scholarships in Australia’ page.

Top Up Scholarships

QBI offers top-up scholarships to students who successfully secure a fully funded national or international scholarship and are enrolled through QBI to do either a PhD or an MPhil. These are currently worth up to $5000 per annum for a maximum of 3.5 years for PhD and 2 years for MPhil students.

Current QBI Lab Group PhD Position/Scholarship Advertisements

PhD Studentship in Neurogenomics

The successful candidate will investigate the role of retrotransposons, a class of mobile DNA, in generating genetic variability in neural cells. Retrotransposons mobilise through RNA intermediates which are reverse transcribed and inserted at new genomic locations, resulting in insertional mutagenesis. Alterations in retrotransposon activity have been linked to a range of stress conditions, neurodegeneration and aging.This project aims to understand how retrotransposons activity can change the neuronal genome and impact upon neuronal physiology, potentially contributing to neurodegeneration.The PhD student will make use of reporter mouse lines to visualise retrotransposon activity in specific brain areas, as well as novel sequencing approaches to detect differential retrotransposon integration patterns in neurodegenerative mouse models as well as post-mortem human case-control sample sets.

The candidate will join the newly established lab group of Professor Geoffrey Faulkner at the Queensland Brain Institute, (QBI) University of Queensland.  Professor Faulkner has a joint appointment with QBI and the Mater Research Institute – University of Queensland (MRI-UQ).  PhD candidates will apply through QBI as the enrolling unit and be primarily based at QBI for research project work but may also spend some time at the MRI-UQ. Find out more about the Faulkner lab group.

Expressions of Interest are invited from outstanding and enthusiastic international and Australian science graduates ideally with a background in neuroscience, genetics or other relevant scientific discipline. Candidates will have a First Class Honours degree or equivalent and should be eligible for UQ scholarship consideration.  Some expertise in molecular biology, microscopy and mouse genetics is required. Previous experience with animal work would be helpful.

For further information about this position and scholarships, application criteria, and expression of interest closing dates, please refer to www.jobs.uq.edu.au/caw/en/job/499903/phd-studentship-in-neurogenomics.

 

PhD Studentship in the synaptic basis of memory formation and loss

The primary purpose of the position is to investigate how memories are stored in the brain and how they are lost during the progression of Alzheimer's disease. This project will investigate the synaptic modifications underlying memory formation and loss, both at structural and functional level. To visualize these changes, the PhD student will take advantage of in-vivo two-photon imaging microscopy, a revolutionary technique which allows the visualization of cellular and subcellular structures inside the brain of living and behaving animals. By performing in-vivo two-photon imaging in animals learning a given memory task, the PhD student will follow the synaptic modifications underlying memory formation in normal animals and also, in transgenic animal models of Alzheimer's disease.

The candidate will join the newly established lab group of Dr Patricio Opazo in the Clem Jones Centre for Ageing Dementia Research at the Queensland Brain Institute, University of Queensland. Find out more about Dr Opazo.

Expressions of Interest are invited from outstanding and enthusiastic international and Australian science graduates ideally with a background in neuroscience, biophysics, biomedical engineering or other relevant scientific discipline. Candidates will have a First Class Honours degree or equivalent and should be eligible for UQ scholarship consideration.  Some expertise in microscopy, molecular biology, animal behaviour and programming (Matlab) is desirable.

For further information on this position, application criteria, and expression of interest closing dates, please refer to www.jobs.uq.edu.au/caw/en/job/499840/phd-studentship-in-the-synaptic-basis-of-memory-formation-and-loss.

 

PhD Studentship in Computational Modelling of Single Molecule Dynamics

Super-resolution imaging techniques now provide unprecedented quantitative information on the spatio-temporal changes in individual protein behaviour in live neurons. Advanced computational tools are required to quantify the dynamics of single molecules from these experiments, and computational models are essential to link single molecule dynamics to neuronal functions such as synaptic transmission. The successful PhD candidate will develop new computational tools and models to infer critical biological insights from the super-resolution imaging experiments. The candidate will join the established groups of Professor Geoffrey Goodhill and Professor Frederic Meunier at the Queensland Brain Institute at the University of Queensland. He/she will work with an interdisciplinary team of mathematicians, physicists, engineers and experimental neuroscientists. Find out more about the Goodhill lab group and Meunier lab group.

Expressions of Interest are invited from outstanding and enthusiastic science graduates ideally with a background in mathematics, physics or engineering. Candidates will have a First Class Honours degree or equivalent and should be eligible for an Australian Postgraduate Award (APA) or equivalent.  Some expertise in computer programing is required. Previous experience in modelling biological systems would be helpful.

For further information on this position, application criteria, and expression of interest closing dates, please refer to www.jobs.uq.edu.au/caw/en/job/499325/phd-studentship-in-computational-modelling-of-single-molecule-dynamics.

Travel Support

Travel support is available to research higher degree students, from QBI and the UQ Graduate School.

More information